As COVID-19 cases increase, the CDC updates the risk level for many NH counties
As COVID-19 cases increase, the CDC updates the risk level for many NH counties

As COVID-19 cases increase, the CDC updates the risk level for many NH counties

Published: 17-04-2022 20:13:19

Modified: 17/04/2022 20:12:01

Residents of most New Hampshire counties may want to consider wearing a mask again, according to county-level guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Eight of New Hampshire’s 10 counties are now considered to have a “medium” level of community transfer, a change that reflects increasing cases in the state.

Community transmission levels rose in Belknap, Carroll, Grafton, Coos, Cheshire, Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Strafford counties. Transmission levels are still considered “low” in Sullivan County and Merrimack County, which include Concord and the surrounding towns.

According to the CDC, residents of middle-risk counties should consider a number of precautions as cases begin to increase. Immunocompromised or high-risk individuals should talk to physicians about whether masks are now needed in public spaces.

Those who often interact with a high-risk person should also consider regular tests and masks.

State and local authorities should also implement security measures, such as enhanced prevention measures in high-risk environments such as homeless shelters and penitentiaries.

Local health officials may also want to implement testing strategies for people who may be exposed to the virus at work, school, or other community settings.

After a brief exposure to coronavirus elevations, COVID-19 cases in New Hampshire are slowly rising again. The number of COVID-19 cases in New Hampshire has increased 55% over the past two weeks, according to government data.

Many experts believe that the increase is due to a sub-variant, called the “stealth variant” or “stealth-omicron”, which is more contagious than previous variants and is currently the dominant strain in the Northeast.

In Concord, virus levels in wastewater have risen sharply, according to CDC’s monitoring system. Rising concentrations of the virus in sewage are often an early warning that more cases are on the way.


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