China’s shutdown of COVID-19 leads to a shortage of contrast agents
China’s shutdown of COVID-19 leads to a shortage of contrast agents

China’s shutdown of COVID-19 leads to a shortage of contrast agents

The COVID-19 shutdown in China last month has led to a global shortage of a solution needed for some critical forms of medical imaging, including CT scans, New Hampshire hospital officials said. The deficiency has developed over the last few weeks. Hospital officials said they essentially have to ration what are known as iodine-containing contrast agents, and some hospitals have postponed all but emergencies that require CT scans. Officials from the New Hampshire Hospital Association said the shutdown in China includes a facility that is the largest U.S. provider of a specific solution that medical personnel inject into blood vessels so devices such as a CT scanner can see inside the body. The resulting images are used to determine treatment for everything from injuries to heart attacks to cancer. The New Hampshire Hospital Association said it is working with hospitals to determine their stock of contrast agents, as it did with critical supplies throughout the pandemic. “Our hospitals, like others across the country, will have the difficult task of allocating their stock to most critical cases until the deficiency subsides, but it may also result in some optional procedures having to be postponed until the deficiency is resolved, “the association said in a written statement. Dartmouth Health said it has formed a task force to ensure it maintains appropriate levels of care for all of its patients. needs arose, “the organization said in a written statement. According to the American Hospital Association, normal production of the solution should resume by the end of next month.

The COVID-19 shutdown in China last month has led to a global shortage of a solution needed for some critical forms of medical imaging, including CT scans, New Hampshire hospital officials said.

The deficiency has developed over the past few weeks. Hospital officials said they essentially have to ration what are known as iodine-containing contrast agents, and some hospitals have postponed all but emergencies that require CT scans.

Officials from the New Hampshire Hospital Association said the shutdown in China includes a facility that is the largest U.S. provider of a specific solution that medical personnel inject into blood vessels so devices such as a CT scanner can see inside the body.

The resulting images are used to determine treatment for everything from injuries to heart attacks to cancer.

The New Hampshire Hospital Association said it is working with hospitals to determine their stock of contrast agents, as it did with critical supplies throughout the pandemic.

“Our hospitals, like others across the country, will have the difficult task of allocating their equipment to the most critical cases until the shortage subsides, but it may also result in some elective procedures having to be postponed until the shortage is resolved,” he says. . This is stated by the association in a written statement.

Dartmouth Health said it has formed a task force to ensure it maintains appropriate levels of care for all of its patients.

“Some routine examinations that require IV contrast are temporarily exposed to maintain and reserve our limited supplies of contrast agent for the most emerging needs,” the organization said in a written statement.

According to the American Hospital Association, normal production of the solution was to resume late next month.

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