Churchgoers eager to gather for Easter service without setback from COVID-19
Churchgoers eager to gather for Easter service without setback from COVID-19

Churchgoers eager to gather for Easter service without setback from COVID-19

From no worship to low attendance, worship houses expect for the first time in two years to see crowds close to pre-pandemic levels for the Easter holidays. COVID-19 infections have decreased compared to this time in 2021 and 2020, but some people are not failing their guards. “For this Easter, we expect people to say, ‘You know what, I think I’m safe going back to church,'” said Dr. Robert Watkins of Majestic Life Church in Orlando. “Last year we held a service outside in our parking lot … we miss our members.” Mask requirements may be a thing of the past for now, but some houses of worship, such as the Majestic Life Church in Orlando, still strongly urge its congregation members to wear a mask. “We will still be careful,” Watkins said. “We’re still taking temperatures on people coming in.” Along with hand sanitizer stations scattered throughout the church, members like Nina Frazier will still have to sit every other row at social distances. “I feel really good about coming here because I know. How conscious everyone is here,” Frazier said. “Especially going to other public places and people have become so relaxed.” The church expects to see 250 people attend Sunday’s service. Watkins said tens of thousands usually tune in online for worship. “In 2020, we met for seven weeks, and then we just switched online like the rest of the world,” said Pastor Petr Buzyan of Elevation Church in Orlando. Elevation Church had just opened its Orlando campus weeks before it was forced to hold worship services online due to the start of the pandemic and COVID-19 restrictions. The church is adding an extra Easter service on Sunday to make more room for what could be a huge turnout. Buzyan said 700 people usually show up for worship on a regular Sunday. “How can we keep the guest in mind when they come in because they might be coming in for the first time,” Buzyan said. “I think we’re still aware as a church – just as much as the whole world – that we want to make sure we give people the opportunity to feel as comfortable as possible.” The local pediatrician Dr. Matthew Seibel said, although things are not at the moment. It does not seem so bad in the pandemic, people should be responsible. “Most people have either been vaccinated or have some degree of natural immunity … but if you have a fever, runny nose or cough, stay home,” Seibel said. “You do not have to spread your viruses to other people.” Spreading love is what churchgoers hope to do together again this holiday. “When we talk about the last two years of what we’ve experienced – it’s the story of Easter that we have hope,” Buzyan said. There will still be online service options for people who do not feel comfortable meeting in person.

From no worship to low attendance, worship houses expect for the first time in two years to see crowds close to pre-pandemic levels for the Easter holidays.

COVID-19 infections have decreased compared to this time in 2021 and 2020, but some people do not fail their guards.

“For this Easter, we expect people to say, ‘You know what, I think I’m safe going back to church,'” said Dr. Robert Watkins of Majestic Life Church in Orlando. “Last year we had service outside in our parking lot … we miss our members.”

Mask demands may be a saga just for now, but some places of worship, like the Majestic Life Church in Orlando, still strongly urge its ward members to wear a mask.

“We will still be careful,” Watkins said. “We’re still taking temperatures on people coming in.”

Along with liquor stations scattered throughout the church, members like Nina Frazier will still have to sit every other row at a social distance.

“I feel really good about coming here because I know how conscious everyone is here,” Frazier said. “Especially going to other public places, and people have become so lax.”

The church expects to see 250 people attend Sunday’s service. Watkins said tens of thousands usually tune in online for worship.

“In 2020, we met for seven weeks, and then we just switched online like the rest of the world,” said Pastor Petr Buzyan of Elevation Church in Orlando.

Elevation Church had just opened its Orlando campus weeks before it was forced to hold services online due to the onset of the pandemic and COVID-19 restrictions.

The church is adding an extra Easter service on Sunday to make more room for what could be a huge turnout. Buzyan said 700 people usually show up for worship on a regular Sunday.

“How can we keep the guest in mind when they come in because they might be coming in for the first time,” Buzyan said. “I think we’re still aware as a church – as much as the whole world – that we want to make sure we give people the opportunity to feel as comfortable as possible.”

The local pediatrician Dr. Matthew Seibel said that even though things are not looking so bad at the moment in the pandemic, people should be held accountable.

“Most people have either been vaccinated or have some degree of natural immunity … but if you have a fever, runny nose or cough, stay home,” Seibel said. “You do not have to spread your viruses to other people.”

Spreading love is what churchgoers hope to do together again this holiday.

“When we talk about the last two years of what we’ve experienced – it’s the story of Easter that we have hope,” Buzyan said.

There will still be online service options for people who do not feel comfortable meeting in person.

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