COVID-19: Companies have made some pandemic changes that are here to stay
COVID-19: Companies have made some pandemic changes that are here to stay

COVID-19: Companies have made some pandemic changes that are here to stay

As more provinces lift back COVID-19 public health measures, some companies have learned positive experiences and developed tools to help curb the spread that has come to stay.

Local & Fresh in Regina had to upscale the delivery service for their grocery market to survive after their ballroom and restaurant closed.

“Our business completely turned upside down when the pandemic hit,” said Local & Fresh owner Tim Shultz.

“We went from making 10 to 15 deliveries a week to 75 deliveries a day during the night.”

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Shultz had to update to new software, hire new drivers and change its entire workflow to remain available to its supporting customers.

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“It was extremely stressful. I still remember the first three weeks. My wife and I lived pretty much here. We wanted to be here from 6 in the morning until midnight for three weeks in a row,” Shultz said.

One of Shultz’s tenants, Karlee Raiwet, had just left her full-time job to start her own business the week before the March 2020 pandemic.

This prompted Raiwet to fight to get an online store up and running to launch a delivery service for her store, The Alternative.

“When someone wanted something, we made ourselves available just because we as a new business had to provide that service. It was huge to get our name out there,” Raiwet said.

Two years later, the Alternative is still up and running with a lot of experience.

“Take one day at a time, one week at a time. You constantly pivot, so it definitely teaches you a lot. Never get too comfortable because you do not know what tomorrow brings, so definitely taught us a lot, and that’s me completely certainly grateful for, “Raiwet said.

Shultz believes he has emerged stronger from the pandemic. The edge and delivery services will now continue past the pandemic.

“Our vision is to make local food available to the local community. And we understand that not the whole community can come in and shop in person. We want to give them the opportunity to access the amazing local products available here,” he said. Schultz

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The pandemic also forced gyms and gyms to be creative and deliver their product online when their doors had to close.


Click to play video: 'COVID-19 work of the future: Virtual fitness centers'







COVID-19 work of the future: Virtual fitness centers


COVID-19 work of the future: Virtual fitness centers

Although online training threw many fitness companies into a loop, some managed to stay connected and engaged with customers.

Dan Farthing, owner of Level 10 Fitness, said many employees were forced to try to figure it out.

“Within a few days, we got in touch with our customers and came in front of the camera and overcame that lack of familiarity and discomfort and just some kind of connection,” Farthing said.

“There are countless online training programs available for people to log in to YouTube, but I think what people love about this site is the community and the personal relationships they have formed.”

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The personal connection and comfort has changed the way many people look at virtual training programs.

“A client or customer would go on a vacation or business trip. Normally they would take that time off from the gym and try to do their own thing. But now they are very comfortable walking down to the hotel gym or the gym in their apartment , and they will instead do a distance training with us, ”said Farthing.

Fit Project Studio co-owner and founder Sasha Ash said they essentially had to turn their business around from day one to the next when the pandemic hit, and figure out how to get it online.

“We had a team of people who were willing to show up and do what was necessary to keep us going. The hard part was the technology, ”said Ash.

Ash said the team at Fit Project showed up every day and did the best they could.

“Things have not always been smooth. They are still not smooth, but you just show up, you learn homework, you do the best you can, and we just want to keep going,” Ash said.

Fit Project saw their business expand beyond Regina to Europe and the United States.

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Because of this, their online platform resulted in a reinvented approach.

“Future studios will have a movie room built into them so we can keep this going and we’re excited to expand, we’m excited to welcome new members to our team, get new members onto our fit TV platform and just keep introducing the world to the Fit Project, ”said Ash.


Click to play video: 'Saskatchewan companies using QR code technology even after COVID-19 mandates are revoked'







Saskatchewan companies using QR code technology even after COVID-19 mandates were revoked


Saskatchewan companies using QR code technology even after COVID-19 mandates were revoked


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