Doctors see an increase in COVID-19-related training injuries – Community News
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Doctors see an increase in COVID-19-related training injuries

Doctors say they are seeing an increase in exercise-related injuries as a result of the pandemic. Basically, people who haven’t exercised for months jump right back in and hurt themselves. Bob Tetz lives in East Sacramento. He said he gained 20 pounds during the pandemic. When he tried to get back into a routine, he ended up at the UC Davis Health Sports Medicine program instead. .Dr. Brandee Waite of UC Davis Health said the increase in exercise injuries during the pandemic is coming from people like Tetz looking to lose some weight. While the time frame before the lockdowns were enacted and when people went back to work varies from person to person, the common thread is that for many people it has been a while. “If they go back to doing exactly what they were trying to do before the pandemic, there’s an increased risk of injury,” Waite said. Many of the common injuries Waite has seen include shoulders, knees, Achilles tendon, and back pain. The increase in injuries has kept UC Davis Health busy, the doctor said. Waite recommends for those who want to get back to an exercise routine to get started more easily, starting at about 25 to 50% of the intensity or duration of what you were doing before you stopped being active. If you feel any sort of tweak in your body, Waite also suggests stopping and resting and not pushing yourself. For Tetz, he is now slowly rehabilitating by doing a lot of hot yoga. “COVID was a problem and it disrupted everything,” Tetz said. time, you have to take it easy.”

Doctors say they are seeing an increase in exercise-related injuries as a result of the pandemic. Basically, people who haven’t exercised for months jump right back in and hurt themselves.

Bob Tetz lives in East Sacramento. He said he gained 20 pounds during the pandemic. When he tried to get back into a routine, he ended up at the UC Davis Health Sports Medicine program instead.

“I used to be so preoccupied with daily workouts — sometimes twice a day — that maybe I overdid it a bit,” Tetz said.

dr. Brandee Waite of UC Davis Health said the increase in exercise injuries during the pandemic is coming from people like Tetz looking to lose some weight. While the time span from before the lockdowns were enacted and to when people went back to work varies from person to person, the common thread is that for many people it has been a while.

“If they go back to doing exactly what they were trying to do before the pandemic, there’s an increased risk of injury,” Waite said.

Many of the common injuries Waite has seen include shoulders, knees, Achilles tendon, and back pain. The increase in injuries has kept UC Davis Health busy, the doctor said.

Waite recommends those looking to get back into an exercise routine start more easily, starting at about 25 to 50% of the intensity or duration of what you were doing before you stopped being active.

If you feel any kind of tweak in your body, Waite also suggests stopping and resting and not pushing yourself.

For Tetz, he is now slowly rehabilitating by doing a lot of hot yoga.

“COVID was a problem and it disrupted everything,” Tetz said. “If you haven’t exercised for a long time, you should take it easy.”

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