Johnson County sees an increase in COVID-19 cases
Johnson County sees an increase in COVID-19 cases

Johnson County sees an increase in COVID-19 cases

The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment is experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases. Health officials said this is a steady increase over the last four weeks or so. They see dozens of cases a day. “In terms of knowing what’s going to happen with COVID, it’s always hard to predict,” said Charlie Hunt, deputy director at JCDHE. The Johnson County Health Department says the omicron subvariant BA.2 is most likely the cause of the increase in cases. Right now it is about 78 cases per. 100,000 within the last seven days. “No available run-up test provided by the department, and more access to home tests, the department says it has been challenging to ensure all COVID-19 cases are reported.” We do not have a complete picture as we could have had before all these home tests were available, but having said that, we think it’s a good thing to have these home tests, “Hunt said. For over a year, the department has said that the best way to keep yourself safe is to get vaccinated “For some people there is a risk of very serious illness. And again, these would mean that you have to spend for these processes. Hopefully we will not also see an increase in serious illness, “Hunt said. As for the symptoms, the department says they still vary from person to person, but it is not as severe as previous variants. A leading wastewater researcher at the University of Missouri says , that the Kansas City area sees almost all-time low levels of COVID-19 in wastewater.But researchers are keeping a close eye on the BA.2 variant.

The Johnson County Department of Health and Environment is experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases.

Health authorities said this is a steady increase over the last four weeks or so.

They see dozens of cases a day.

“In terms of knowing what’s going to happen with COVID, it’s always hard to predict,” said Charlie Hunt, vice president at JCDHE.

The Johnson County Health Department says the omicron subvariant BA.2 is most likely the cause of the increase in cases.

Right now it is about 78 cases per. 100,000 within the last seven days.

“This is not unexpected, but of course, with COVID, you never know what’s going to happen, but we’re not surprised at all,” Hunt said.

Without any available driving test provided by the department and more access to home testing, the department says it has been challenging to ensure that all COVID-19 cases are reported.

“We do not have a complete picture that we could have had before all of these home tests were available, but having said that, we think it’s a good thing to have these home tests,” Hunt said.

For over a year, the department has been saying that the best way to keep yourself safe is to get vaccinated.

“For some people, there is a risk of very serious illness. And again, we are learning more and more about it as time goes on. Hopefully, we will not also see an increase in serious illness,” Hunt said.

As for the symptoms, the department says they still vary from person to person, but it is not as severe as previous variants.

A leading wastewater researcher at the University of Missouri says the Kansas City area sees near-all-time lows of COVID-19 in wastewater.

However, researchers are keeping a close eye on the sub-variant BA.2.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.