Judge dismisses jurors with COVID-19, says the Flint water crisis case can not afford further delay
Judge dismisses jurors with COVID-19, says the Flint water crisis case can not afford further delay

Judge dismisses jurors with COVID-19, says the Flint water crisis case can not afford further delay

FLINT, MI – A jury in a civil lawsuit in the Flint water crisis has been rejected after testing positive for COVID-19 for the second week in a row Monday, May 23rd.

Judge Judith E. Levy of the U.S. District Court acquitted the jury, despite objections from two engineering consultants, that four Flint children are suing in the trial.

Levy said it was no longer an option to wait for the juries, which first reported her illness on May 17, as the case already took longer than she had expected, and other days were already planned to accommodate the remaining nine members. by the jury.

“I do not think we have a reasonable alternative … I’m just very worried that we will lose momentum and coherence in the jury” if we continue to wait, the judge said on Monday. “If we want this jury in our case, I do not think we have a choice because people are losing momentum. Their memories will go down and burn if we are not here and working with them.”

The water crisis’s civil lawsuit began in late February, and Levy had initially estimated it could end in June.

But the attorneys for the Flint children have not yet completed their case, and attorneys for Veolia North America and Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam have not yet called a single witness to the trial.

Lawyers for the children claim that Veolia and LAN are partly responsible for injuries, including brain damage, that their clients suffered after drinking Flint water during the water crisis.

They claim that the companies, each consulting with the city during the water crisis, were negligent in their work in Flint.

The companies have questioned the damages the children are claiming, saying local, state and federal officials are responsible for damages caused by the water crisis.

Levy has been leading the horizontal trial from 6 p.m. 9.00 to kl. 13.30 Mondays to Thursdays, but some days have run short or were taken off the calendar due to illness, jury commitments and the availability of witnesses.

The case is scheduled to resume Tuesday, May 24 in Ann Arbor.

read more on The Flint Journal:

Garbage investigation has cost Flint taxpayers $ 25,000 so far, and the next steps are unclear

Flint children’s math performance declined after water crisis, UM study says

Summer-long I-69 traffic shifts start in Lapeer County

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.