Kansas City counselor Amanda Davis in COVID-19’s effect on teens’ mental health
Kansas City counselor Amanda Davis in COVID-19’s effect on teens’ mental health

Kansas City counselor Amanda Davis in COVID-19’s effect on teens’ mental health

Two years after the pandemic, it is clear that our world has changed. For teens, it can have long-term effects on mental health. It’s being called a national crisis. “We see a lot of children who have lost primary caregivers or grandparents who were very important who died of COVID. We see that children are really struggling to adapt as restrictions change , especially when it comes to school, “said Amanda Davis, a counselor at the Crittenton Children’s Center. Davis said the effect of COVID-19 on children’s mental health is far-reaching. It is magnified for those who were already struggling, but the trauma for those who had thrived is also disturbing. “For their children than I have had in my entire 18-year career,” Davis said. The top three medical organizations report soaring rates of depression, anxiety, trauma, and loneliness among teens. Much of it they associate with the loss of a normal routine. Davis said developing brains rely on some predictability. Losing it can be traumatic for a young person. “I’m really worried that the anxiety that is somehow always present in our society is changing the way their brain is built. And I’m really worried about the “children, we’re going to see effects in the next few decades,” Davis said. Also worrying is the number of suicides and suicide attempts and the lack of beds in acute cases. Davis encourages parents to listen to their teens. Let them know that there is help out there and that they are not alone. “I think it’s really important to get those messages to teenagers that it’s OK to fight right now. It’s perfectly normal,” said Davis. She said this is a sign that a teenager might be struggling: If they tell you, they will feel overwhelmed. If the grades start to drop. If they are no longer social or sleep patterns change. Davis said school counselors can be a great resource because they work closely with local therapists to connect families with the help they need.

Two years after the pandemic, it is clear that our world has changed. For teens, it can have long-term effects on mental health. It is being called a national crisis.

“We see a lot of children who have lost primary caregivers or grandparents who were very important, who died of COVID. We see that children are really struggling to adapt as the restrictions change, especially when it comes to school, said Amanda Davis, a counselor at the Crittenton Children’s Center.

Davis said the effect of COVID-19 on children’s mental health is far-reaching. It is magnified for those who were already struggling, but the trauma for those who had thrived is also disturbing.

“We see a lot of parents who are very concerned. I’ve personally had more colleagues who are parents reaching out for counseling resources for their children than I have had in my entire 18-year career,” Davis said.

The top three medical organizations report soaring rates of depression, anxiety, trauma, and loneliness among teens. Much of it they associate with the loss of a normal routine. Davis said developing brains rely on some predictability. Losing it can be traumatic for a young person.

“I’m really worried that the anxiety that is more or less present in our society is changing the way their brains are built. And I’m really worried about those kids that we’re going to see effects in the next couple decades. ” said Davis.

Also worrying is the number of suicides and suicide attempts and the lack of beds in acute cases. Davis encourages parents to listen to their teens. Let them know that there is help out there and that they are not alone.

“I think it’s really important to get those messages to teens that it’s OK to fight right now. It’s perfectly normal,” Davis said.

She said these are signs that a teenager may be struggling:

  • If they tell you, they will feel overwhelmed.
  • If the grades start to drop.
  • If they are no longer social or sleep patterns change.

Davis said school counselors can be a great resource because they work closely with local therapists to connect families with the help they need.

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