Lodi Unified uses federal COVID-19 money to increase literacy among students
Lodi Unified uses federal COVID-19 money to increase literacy among students

Lodi Unified uses federal COVID-19 money to increase literacy among students

Pandemic-related learning loss has been a concern among parents over the past two years. To help, the Lodi Unified School District has found a way to build students’ reading levels through a program known as “Systemic Instruction in Phenome Awareness Phonics and Sight Words,” otherwise known as SIPPS. The district invited KCRA 3 to learn how SIPPS works at Nichols Elementary School, where the class of Mrs. Ruth Clark’s classroom is divided into three groups to meet with Mrs. Clark. In small groups, they practice speaking and learning new words and sounds. The lessons are the building blocks that Angel Cantellano in second grade said helps him build his confidence to read. The boy said that when he started second grade, his reading skills were “not that good.” Cantellano said the group sessions help him break down what might otherwise seem like challenging concepts. “It was pretty fun because I learned more, newer words,” Cantellano said. Nichols Elementary has been using SIPPS since 2014. Clark said it has been instrumental in teaching its students. “The SIPPS program helps them build the foundation that will help them throughout their entire education,” said Clark, who is new to teaching second grade but has been a fifth- and sixth-grade teacher for more than a year. a decade. dedicated to promoting reading skills in the school district. SIPPS is now used in many more Lodi schools. ” With SIPPS funding, we could not only work with students in the classrooms for SIPPS, but also get books in their hands, “said Lindsay Streeter, principal of Nichols Elementary School. Streeter said 80% of Nichols Elementary School students come from low-income households. income. She explained that the program has helped bridge learning gaps caused by the pandemic and other factors. “Between 2014 and 2019, the reading level of students at Nichols doubled,” Streeter said. Cantellano said these lessons have increased his love for teacher, tells KCRA 3 that he feels “complete”.

Pandemic-related learning loss has been a concern among parents over the past two years.

To help, the Lodi Unified School District has found a way to build students’ reading levels through a program known as “Systemic Instruction in Phenome Awareness Phonics and Sight Words,” otherwise known as SIPPS.

The district invited KCRA 3 to learn how SIPPS works at Nichols Elementary School, where the class of Mrs. Ruth Clark’s classroom is divided into three groups to meet with Mrs. Clark. In small groups, they practice speaking and learning new words and sounds.

The lessons are the building blocks, as Angel Cantellano in second grade said, helping him build his confidence to read. The boy said that when he started second grade, his reading skills were “not that good.”

Cantellano said the group sessions help him break down what might otherwise seem like challenging concepts.

“It was pretty fun because I learned more, newer words,” Cantellano said.

Nichols Elementary has been using SIPPS since 2014. Clark said it has been instrumental in teaching her students.

“The SIPPS program helps them build the foundation that will help them throughout their education,” said Clark, who is new to second-grade teaching but has been a fifth- and sixth-grade teacher for more than a decade.

Thanks to more than $ 168 million in federal COVID-19 funding, nearly $ 500,000 has been dedicated to promoting school-based literacy skills. SIPPS is now used at many more Lodi school locations.

“Having SIPPS funding enabled us not only to work with students in the classrooms for SIPPS, but also to get books in their hands,” said Lindsay Streeter, Nichols Elementary School Principal.

Streeter said 80% of Nichols Elementary School students come from low-income households. She explained that the program has helped bridge learning gaps caused by the pandemic and other factors.

“Between 2014 and 2019, the reading level of students at Nichols doubled,” Streeter said.

Cantellano said these lessons have increased his love of learning, telling KCRA 3 that he feels “perfect.”

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