mRNA COVID-19 vaccines offer ‘quite encouraging’ long-term protection
mRNA COVID-19 vaccines offer ‘quite encouraging’ long-term protection

mRNA COVID-19 vaccines offer ‘quite encouraging’ long-term protection

March 4, 2022

2 min read

Source:

Crotty S. RJ Fasenmyer Center for Clinical Immunology Annual Lecturer: Understanding Immunity and Immune Memory versus SARS-CoV-2 and the Potential of Broad Coronavirus Vaccines. Presented at Basic and Clinical Immunology for the Busy Clinician; February 26, 2022. (virtual meeting).


Information: Crotty reported no relevant financial information.


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mRNA vaccines not only provided a strong short-term immune response to COVID-19, but also sustained immunity for at least 6 months, said a speaker at Basic and Clinical Immunology for the Busy Clinician symposium.

“This virus gave rise to fears that people were developing an adaptive immune response at all,” Shane Crotty, PhD, professor at the Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research at the LaJolla Institute of Immunology in California. “[We started studying] this long before vaccines were even developed. “


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“The RNA vaccines have been incredibly successful and clearly elicited really good short-term neutralizing antibody responses and were clearly able to elicit T cell responses,” Shane Crotty, PhDtold the participants.

In his laboratory work, Crotty has spent considerable time simply understanding the nature of the three branches of immunity – B cells, CD4 T cells and CD8 kills T cells – and role they play in the fight against COVID-19. “The basic principle of my laboratory is to understand the immunology of this and improve it.”

One of the key questions is how long immunological memory lasts after a person has been infected with the virus, which largely involved measuring levels of these different types of cells at different times. “Immunological memory in humans is difficult to predict,” he said.

The heterogeneity of immune memory from person to person has a “1,000-fold range” for the cellular parameters that Crotty has assessed in his laboratory.

Armed with this background of knowledge, Crotty then turned Vaccines against covid-19.

“The RNA vaccines have been incredibly successful and clearly elicited really good short-term neutralizing antibody responses and were clearly able to elicit T cell responses,” Crotty said. What is less certain is how well the evoked T cell memory or CD8 T cell responses. “Those were the questions we wanted to answer.”

In an early study of a reduced dose vaccine published in ScienceCrotty and colleagues determined that antibodies dropped approx. 10 times with approx. 6 months after the second dose.

However, the number of CD4 T cells decreased by only approx. twice after the second dose. “We thought it was pretty encouraging,” Crotty said.

In terms of CD8 T cells, approx. two-thirds of individuals just a doubling after 6 months. “Again, we thought this was a pretty amazing result too and mRNA vaccinesaid Crotty.

Regarding the question of whether T cells recognize variants, Crotty suggested that previous COVID-19 infection may elicit some CD4 and CD8 T cell response. But further data on the nature of this answer. He suggested that T-cell recognition of omicron is “persistent.”

If there is one last factor to consider, it is the number of exposures to COVID-19 in one form or another. Multiple exposures, either from hybrid immunity or several vaccinesis good, “said Crotty.” Your immune system is good at recognizing variants. “

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