New omicron subvariant is not expected to lead to another COVID-19 increase
New omicron subvariant is not expected to lead to another COVID-19 increase

New omicron subvariant is not expected to lead to another COVID-19 increase

As omicron cases continue to decline across the region, health departments in the District, Virginia and Maryland have reported new cases of a subvariant strain of the disease, but an expert said it does not appear that the latest version of COVID-19 will lead to another increase in cases.

As omicron cases continue to decline across the region, health departments in the District, Virginia and Maryland have reported new cases of a subvariant strain of the disease, but an expert said it does not appear that the latest version of COVID-19 will lead to another increase in cases.

The original omicron variant, which sent case numbers into the air over the winter, is also known as BA.1; the new sub-variant is called BA.2.

“I think it is important to note that although the number of cases for BA.2 is increasing, they are not increasing near the way that the BA.1 case increased,” he said. Dr. Andy Pekoszprofessor and virologist at Johns Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health.

He said early observations show that the latest version of the virus may not be as effective when it comes to how it spreads.

Pekosz also told people who have the original omicron variant that early results from studies appear to show they may have “descent protection” against the new subvariant, but he warned that it is not guaranteed. He said people who have been vaccinated and boosted should also have good protection against omicron 2.0.

Some recent studies also show that a third booster can provide protection for a very long period of time, covering several variants, Pekosz said.

“I think the immunity from a booster shot, especially one that you know in the 5 to 6 months after your first vaccination, seems to be a really strong boost that not only gives you high amounts of protection, but it is also broad protection. ” said Pekosz.

Pekosz said what needs to be kept in mind is how many people who have been vaccinated or boosted have a severe case of the omicron variant and end up in the hospital.

“As long as we are protected from serious illness, we may not need a fourth booster at least in the short term,” Pekosz said.

Studies continue on how much natural immunity one can get from being applied and recovering from COVID-19, but he said people who have been given coronavirus and have been immunized have strong protection.

“The best immunities we see right now are people who were vaccinated and then infected,” he said.

In the DC region, some communities are withdrawing on COVID-19 restrictions. While there is light at the end of the tunnel, Pekosz warns that communities need to be careful about rolling cases back too early because it could result in the number of cases rising to higher levels than public health officials would like to see.

“I imagine another week or two, and if these trends continue, we’ll really settle in a very comfortable place in terms of the manageable amount of cases, and it might be a really good time to start thinking about relieving some of these public health interventions, ”Pekosz said.


More news on coronavirus

Are you looking for more information? DC, Maryland and Virginia are releasing more data every day. Visit their official pages here: Virginia | Maryland | DC

Like WTOP on Facebook and follow the WTOP further Twitter and Instagram to participate in conversation about this article and others.

Get the latest news and daily headlines delivered to your inbox by signing up here.

© 2022 WTOP. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users within the European Economic Area.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.