Pittsylvania-Danville Health District Leaders Gather to Review COVID-19 Response, Post-Pandemic Targeting | Local news
Pittsylvania-Danville Health District Leaders Gather to Review COVID-19 Response, Post-Pandemic Targeting |  Local news

Pittsylvania-Danville Health District Leaders Gather to Review COVID-19 Response, Post-Pandemic Targeting | Local news

From staff reports

Virginia Health Commissioner Colin M. Greene visited Chatham last week as health leaders from two districts gathered to review the response to COVID-19 and cast an eye on getting out of the pandemic.







Dr. Scott Spillmann, director of the health districts of Pittsylvania-Danville and Southside, speaks at Friday’s meeting.


Contributed photo


Staff from the Pittsylvania-Danville and Southside health districts met Friday to review the corona response over the past two years and set goals for the future.

Since the virus began infiltrating everyday life in March 2020, 25,091 infections and 476 deaths have been recorded in the record books of the Pittsylvania-Danville Health District. The number of cases probably underestimates the true number of people infected, as not everyone sought an official test when they became ill.

The recurring message of the event was teamwork.

“Over the last two years, our team of a few has done so much for so many with so little,” said Dr. Scott Spillmann, director of both health districts when he started the meeting.

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Dr. Colin M. Greene, the newly appointed state health commissioner, spoke with staff from the Pittsylvania-Danville and Southside health districts on Friday.


Contributed photo


Greene also spoke and answered questions from staff.

Spillmann discussed how the health team transformed and grew from the COVID-19 reaction, it says in a press release. The workers had many stories of how the two districts struck over the past two years, including things like filling out vaccination clinics and testing events and helping with paperwork to distribute COVID-19 information and signage for social distancing.

The discussion then moved on to what is next for both districts as workers shift back to pre-pandemic tasks.

“For a while now, we’ve been concentrating on treating people,” Spillmann said. “Now is the time for us to return to focusing on caring for their health.”

Spillmann hopes that they can now come back to take care of the health of the whole community. Both districts offer a range of local health services to prevent disease, promote healthy lifestyles and protect our communities from environmental and other hazards, the publication said.

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