Some restaurants are still recovering 2 years after the COVID-19 pandemic
Some restaurants are still recovering 2 years after the COVID-19 pandemic

Some restaurants are still recovering 2 years after the COVID-19 pandemic

2 years later: A look at how some restaurants fared during the COVID-19 pandemic

Restaurantists said this feels like the first normal St. Patrick’s Day since the COVID-19 pandemic forced closures and restrictions, but the Restaurant Association of Maryland said the eateries performed better than expected over the past two years. Two years ago restaurants had to be closed and some were never able to open their doors again, but it seems that everything is slowly returning to normal. || COVID-19 Updates | Maryland’s latest figures | Get tested | Vaccine info || “I think everyone is ready to live life again. They are ready to come out and just have fun and celebrate life,” said Shotti’s co-owner Kristie Bukowski. Shotti’s Point, in Locust Point, was packed with patrons who would do just that. “I’m glad to see that everyone has enjoyed the day so far and is enjoying the restrictions being lifted in the city, so it’s been great, “Protector Steve Sansone said. Two years ago, Governor Larry Hogan had just ordered restaurants to carry out delivery only to stop the spread of coronavirus.” You will, with the closure of up to 40% of restaurants, we had predicted, “said Restaurant Association of Maryland President and CEO Marshall Weston. Fortunately, Weston said the figure two years later is 15% to 18%. He said several things helped restaurants perform better than originally expected.” The state aid was certainly useful, but I really think all communities took the step up and tried to beautify their local establishments as best they could, “Weston said. Bukowski said her establishment made shifts where they could.” the neighborhood was very supportive. Everyone was very supportive, “said Bukowski. Shotti’s Point has a big thank you to their patrons for helping them survive. They also got some money from Jimmy’s Seafood fundraiser that helped keep them afloat. They know that they are not out of the woods yet, but now they are planning the unknown. ” So we save a little more here and there and have definitely our staff in mind, “said Shotti’s Points co-owner Dan Bukowski. Weston said many restaurants incurred a lot of debt to stay in business, so still, the best thing to do. to help is to care for them.

Restaurantists said this feels like the first normal St. Patrick’s Day since the COVID-19 pandemic forced shutdowns and restrictions, but the Restaurant Association of Maryland said the eateries performed better than expected over the past two years.

Two years ago, restaurants had to be closed and some were never able to open their doors again, but it seems that everything is slowly returning to normal.

|| COVID-19 updates | Maryland’s latest figures | Get tested | Vaccine info ||

“I think everyone is ready to live life again. They are ready to come out and just have a good time and celebrate life,” said Shotti’s co-owner Kristie Bukowski.

Shotti’s Point, in Locust Point, was filled with patrons who wanted to do just that.

“I’m glad to see that everyone has enjoyed the day so far and is enjoying the restrictions that are being lifted in the city, so it’s been great,” said patron Steve Sansone.

Two years ago, Governor Larry Hogan had just ordered restaurants to carry out delivery only to stop the spread of coronavirus.

“Probably early in the pandemic, it looked like the restaurant industry would be traumatized, if you will, with the closure of up to 40% of restaurants is what we predicted,” said Restaurant Association of Maryland President and CEO Marshall Weston said.

Fortunately, Weston said the figure two years later is 15% to 18%. He said several things helped restaurants perform better than originally expected.

“Of course the state aid was useful, but I really think all communities took the step and tried to nurture their local establishments as best they could,” Weston said.

Bukowski said her company made changes where they could.

“I think we switched when we could, so in the beginning it was just we were completely shut down. We went for transportation, then it was outdoor seating. We had a small sash window in front, we converted, and the neighborhood was very supportive. Everyone was very supportive, “Bukowski said.

Shotti’s Point has a big thank you to their patrons for helping them survive. They also got some money from Jimmy’s Seafood Collection which helped keep them afloat. They know they are not out of the woods yet, but now they are planning the unknown.

“We have planned to put money away for just such an occasion, ‘Hey what if it happens again?’ So we save a little more here and there and definitely keep our staff in mind, “said Shotti’s Point co-owner Dan Bukowski.

Weston said many restaurants incurred a lot of debt as they tried to stay in business, so still the best thing to do is to help garner them.

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