South Shore COVID-19 cases dropped nearly 90 percent from omicron-top
South Shore COVID-19 cases dropped nearly 90 percent from omicron-top

South Shore COVID-19 cases dropped nearly 90 percent from omicron-top

QUINCY – In the last four weeks, the number of COVID-19 cases in the region has dropped by almost 90 percent from what they were at the height of omicron variant increase.

In most South Shore communities, the number of new cases in the last two-week period is less than the nationwide average, the latest statistics from Massachusetts Department of Public Health show.

In the latest state report for cities and towns, covering the two weeks ending Feb. 12, there were 2,249 laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, in 23 South Shore communities. This compares with 3,739 for the two weeks ending 5 February and 20,490 for the period ending 15 January. The report only includes laboratory-confirmed tests, not infections detected in home tests.

Only four communities had infection rates per capita. 100,000 people higher than the nationwide average of 36.5, with the highest being Hanover with 51.2. The others are Hingham, Norwell and Plymouth.

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The first day of personal instruction at Lincoln-Hancock School in Quincy went like any other year, but with masks, Thursday, September 17, 2020.

In Thursday’s daily report, the State Department of Health counted 2,326 new COVID-19 cases, bringing the total number for the two-year pandemic to 1,527,970.

The number of admissions for COVID-19 is 776, with 152 of the patients in intensive care units and 74 on respiratory tubes.

There were 37 further deaths reported on the South Shore, for a pandemic totaling 22,361.

Quincy reported 12 new cases Thursday, bringing the city’s total number of cases to 19,699. The city has recorded 160 deaths as a result of COVID-19.

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