Systemic anti-cancer treatment is not linked to higher COVID-19 mortality – Consumer Health News
Systemic anti-cancer treatment is not linked to higher COVID-19 mortality – Consumer Health News

Systemic anti-cancer treatment is not linked to higher COVID-19 mortality – Consumer Health News

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Cancer patients actively receiving systemic anticancer therapy (SACT) who become infected with COVID-19 do not experience higher COVID-19 mortality, according to a study published online February 21 in JAMA Network Open.

Csilla VĂ¡rnai, Ph.D., from the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues assessed whether SACTs are associated with COVID-19 mortality. The analysis included 2,515 adult patients with an active cancer and a clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 (March 18 to August 1, 2020).

The researchers found that mortality was 38 percent, with a correlation between higher mortality in patients with hematologic malignant neoplasms regardless of recent SACT, especially in those with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (odds ratio). [OR]2.16) and myeloma or plasmacytoma (OR, 1.53). There was also significantly higher COVID-19-related mortality associated with lung cancer (OR, 1.58). When adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, no association was observed between higher mortality and receiving chemotherapy in the four weeks prior to diagnosis of COVID-19. Lower mortality was associated with receiving immunotherapy in the four weeks before COVID-19 diagnosis (immunotherapy versus no cancer therapy: OR, 0.52).

“In this study, while patients with cancer had poorer COVID-19 scores than other individuals with COVID-19, such a difference in outcome may be associated with age, gender, comorbidities, and cancer subtype rather than anticancer treatments,” the authors write.

Several authors revealed economic connections to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract / full text

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