The COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting Georgia’s supply chain
The COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting Georgia’s supply chain

The COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting Georgia’s supply chain

Governor Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency as supply chain problems continue as small business owners in central Georgia continue to struggle to stay afloat

MACON, Ga. – While transport may be returning to normal, the pandemic continues to disrupt the supply chain.

Governor Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency this weekend as supply chain problems continue and small business owners in Central Georgia continue to struggle to stay afloat.

A Macon baker and an economics professor say COVID-19 still has a huge impact on the supply chain.

Tommy Sadler, owner of Tommy’s Bakery & CafĂ©, says the supply chain has affected most businesses. He has learned to do more with less.

“They might do the work of two instead of one. That’s what you have to do – train them, cross train them. All my employees know how to do everything,” Sadler said.

Sadler opened his bakery seven years ago. He says right now that there is always something missing when he gets a truck delivery.

He says the prices of meat and dairy products have risen, but it’s not just food – it’s other things he needs like containers, plates and cups.

All in all, these costs make it harder for him to continue.

JJ Arias, an economics professor at Georgia College says, in addition, there is still a shortage of labor.

“When they feel that the economy is not in danger of another recession and maybe inflation is under control, then companies will be more optimistic and they will increase their production,” Arias said.

Sadler says he hopes to see prices return to the time before COVID.

The governor’s executive order reduces the truck drivers’ ordinance so they can increase their transportation.

Arias says it will have a positive effect.

Anti-pricing laws are also in order, which Arias believes may cause a problem. He says it can make empty shelves more likely and can encourage people to stock up because the price is cheaper.

Arias says it also discourages suppliers from bringing in the goods as the supply has to sell at a lower price.

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