The first confirmed COVID-19 case in New Hampshire reported two years ago
The first confirmed COVID-19 case in New Hampshire reported two years ago

The first confirmed COVID-19 case in New Hampshire reported two years ago

It is two years since New Hampshire saw its first reported case of COVID-19 on March 2, 2020. The first person in New Hampshire to contract the virus was an employee at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. A week later, by state lockdown, closed businesses and schools were moved to remote control. Heidi Kukla, an intensive care nurse at Elliot Hospital in Manchester, was the first granite state to receive the vaccine. She said she would not hesitate to do it again. “Any long-term effect or short-term side effect is better than the pain, suffering, fear and isolation that our critically ill Covid patients experience,” Kukla said. Kukla said that the vaccines probably eased the burden of COVID-19 on the state. Since 2020, there have been more than 298,000 cases in total, which is nearly 22% of the entire population of New Hampshire. The Department of Health and Human Services reported 2,387 granite states have died. In the second year of the pandemic, there were most infections with 223,000 cases or 75% of all cases, while the first year saw more deaths, more than 1,200 deaths or 52% of all deaths. As New Hampshire navigates its area way out of yet another increase, local hospitals remain hopeful for the future. “Do not know what summer and autumn bring, I hope it is not as it was this winter, so we cross our fingers.” said Matt Gibb, chief clinical officer at Concord Hospital. “Our staff are still incredibly tired, they will spend months recovering from this, but there is a sense of hope,” said Martha Wassell, director of infection prevention at Wentworth-Douglass Hospital. Doctors said that while we are experiencing some relief, COVID-19 may be something that people will have to live with, meaning periods of mitigation.

It is two years since New Hampshire saw its first reported case of COVID-19 on March 2, 2020.

The first person in New Hampshire to contract the virus was an employee at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

A week later, the state was closed, businesses closed, and schools moved aside.

Heidi Kukla, an intensive care nurse at Elliot Hospital in Manchester, was the first granite state to receive the vaccine.

She said she would not hesitate to do it again.

“Any long-term effect or short-term side effect is better than the pain, suffering, fear and isolation that our critically ill Covid patients experience,” Kukla said.

Kukla said the vaccines likely eased the burden of COVID-19 on the state.

Since 2020, there have been more than 298,000 cases in total, which is nearly 22% of the entire population of New Hampshire.

The Department of Health and Human Services reported that 2,387 granite states have died.

The second year of the pandemic saw the most infections with 223,000 cases or 75% of all cases, while the first year saw more deaths, more than 1,200 deaths or 52% of all deaths.

While New Hampshire is navigating out of yet another increase, local hospitals remain hopeful for the future.

“Do not know what summer and fall bring, I hope it is not as it was this winter, so we cross our fingers,” said Matt Gibb, chief clinical officer at Concord Hospital.

“Our staff is still incredibly tired, they will spend months recovering from this, but there is a sense of hope,” said Martha Wassell, director of infection prevention at Wentworth-Douglass Hospital.

Doctors said that while we are experiencing some relief, COVID-19 may be something that people will have to live with, meaning periods of mitigation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.