The United States, China must have technological and economic competition, not confrontation
The United States, China must have technological and economic competition, not confrontation

The United States, China must have technological and economic competition, not confrontation

The United States does not need to have an armed conflict with China, but instead intends a “tough” technological and economic competition, US President Joe Biden said on Friday. Speaking at a press briefing on increasing the supply of semiconductors and rebuilding supply chains, Biden stated that he had made it clear to his Chinese counterpart that it was a ‘competition’ rather than a US-China confrontation.

“We do not have to have a confrontation, but we have tough economic and technological competition. And we will insist that everyone, including China, play by the same rules,” President Joe Biden told a news conference on Friday.

In his speech, Biden also accused China of “doing everything” to take over the global market in an attempt to “outcompete” the rest. Biden stressed the need to address bottlenecks in the U.S. supply chain, saying U.S. production needs to be more resilient to disruptions such as the intensified effects of the pandemic, climate change or cyber attacks. “We will invest whatever it takes in America,” he said, adding that the United States is “better positioned globally than we have been for a long, long time.”

It should be mentioned that Biden had made a similar statement during his concluding remarks at the COP26 summit in Glasgow. “Am I worried about an armed conflict or something that happens by accident with China? No, I’m not. But as I’ve said before and I think we should talk about this … I have “This is a competition. It does not have to be a conflict,” the US president said.

Rising tensions between the US and China

It is pertinent to mention that Washington and Beijing have locked horns over a myriad of issues, including Taiwan, human rights violations, and sailing through Indo-Pacific waters. Biden and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping had discussed their positions on Taiwan in November, when the White House reiterated its support for a “China policy”. But later in December, the Biden family declared a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing due to alleged violations of civil rights by Uighur Muslims, Tibetans and other Turkish communities. Meanwhile, China has repeatedly denied allegations of such violations and warned of unspecified “consequences” against those who follow the US troop to boycott the Games, saying Washington’s move is an attempt to “politicize” sports and respect the Olympic charter.

(Image: AP)


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