The United States does not have ‘a chance to fight’ if Russia and China combine cyber technology, says former Pentagon official
The United States does not have ‘a chance to fight’ if Russia and China combine cyber technology, says former Pentagon official

The United States does not have ‘a chance to fight’ if Russia and China combine cyber technology, says former Pentagon official

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China may already be sharing data with Russia, and America would not have “a chance to fight” if the two superpowers combined their cyber warfare, the former U.S. Air Force chief of staff told Fox News.

“Not many nations would be able to push back,” Nicolas Chaillan told Fox News. “I do not even think the United States would be able to push back if Russia and China decide tomorrow to go together against us.”

“I think it would be very difficult for us to be able to have a chance to fight at all, let alone a nation like Ukraine,” he added.

Russia went into its eighth day of battle after invading Ukraine on 24 February. Western intelligence services predicted that the superpower would quickly sweep through its neighbor, however Ukraine still controls its capital, Kiev.

In this photo provided by the press service of the Russian Ministry of Defense on Monday, February 14, 2022. A MiG-31 fighter jet from the Russian Air Force takes off at an air base during military exercises in the Tver region, Russia. (Russian Ministry of Defense press service via AP)

PENTAGON POSTS ICBM TEST IN THE MIDDLE OF TENSION WITH RUSSIA

Chaillan said, “this is not the full force of the Russian capabilities,” which he called “enormous.”

“They have not used the most innovative options yet,” Chaillan told Fox News. “They focus on the more traditional warfare capabilities.”

“We have to be careful. I always remind people of that [Russian] Chairman [Vladimir] Putin is not stupid, “Chaillan said.” We may not yet understand what his plan was all along. “

But the former Pentagon official said he is “far more afraid of China.” Chaillan said it would be “game changing” if China provided Russia with advanced technologies.

Chaillan thinks China would first give Russia capacity for cybercrime.

Ukrainian soldiers captured from Zmiinyi Island, or "Snake" Iceland, was brought to Sevastopol in Crimea on February 26, 2022. Russian media said that the soldiers will be sent back to Ukraine pending certain "legal procedures." (Photo by the Russian Ministry of Defense TASS via Getty Images)

Ukrainian soldiers captured from Zmiinyi Island, or “Snake” Island, were brought to Sevastopol in Crimea on February 26, 2022. Russian media said the soldiers would be sent back to Ukraine pending certain “legal procedures”. (Photo by the Russian Ministry of Defense TASS via Getty Images)
(Russian Ministry of Defense TASS via Getty Images)

“You also have some AI and machine learning features that can be used to look at satellite images and find out where troops are located, be able to do better real-time analysis of what’s going on on Earth,” Chaillan said.

The former Pentagon official said he would not be surprised if China already shared data with Russia. But he warned of possible consequences if U.S or other Western nations offered the same support to Ukraine.

“We have to be very careful,” Chaillan told Fox News. “If we start delivering cyber-offensive capabilities, nothing will stop Russia from fighting back and going after our critical infrastructure.”

Russian naval vessels are anchored in a bay in the Black Sea port of Sevastopol in Crimea on May 8, 2014.

Russian naval vessels are anchored in a bay in the Black Sea port of Sevastopol in Crimea on May 8, 2014.
(REUTERS / Stringer / File Photo)

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That International Institute of Strategic Studies placed the United States as the sole country at its highest level when assessing the cyber power of 15 nations. China and Russia were ranked in the second row along with Western countries like France and Britain.

But Chaillan said the cyber defense for critical infrastructure, such as power and water systems, is “at the kindergarten level.”

“It would be very influential for American citizens if something were to happen,” Chaillan said. “They could potentially remove the network in weeks, if not months.”

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