Tuolumne County remains in ‘medium’ COVID-19 risk category despite continued improvement | News
Tuolumne County remains in ‘medium’ COVID-19 risk category despite continued improvement |  News

Tuolumne County remains in ‘medium’ COVID-19 risk category despite continued improvement | News

Tuolumne County’s COVID-19 numbers have fallen to their lowest levels since before the start of the omicron wave in December, but not enough for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to downgrade the county’s risk level from “medium” to “low. “

The county remained one of only five counties in California that have not moved into the “low” category of the CDC’s new “community levels” classification system, with Del Norte, Trinity, Shasta and Modoc counties to the north being the other four still sitting. firm. on “medium” from Friday.

A county’s risk level is based on the number of new hospital admissions for COVID-19 per 100,000 residents over the past seven days, the percentage of staffed hospital beds occupied by COVID-19 patients over the past seven days, and the total number of seven days of new cases per 100,000 residents.

Tuolumne County’s seven-day case in total per. 100,000 inhabitants was 290.03 from Friday, a slight increase from 284.52 the week before. New hospital admissions fell slightly to 9.3 from 9.8, while the percentage of occupied beds also fell to 7.5% from 8.3%.

The CDC says people in “medium-sized” counties should talk to their health care provider about whether to wear a mask and take other precautions to reduce their risk, stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and be tested if they have symptoms. .

People in “low” counties are only advised to stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and be tested if they have symptoms, according to the CDC.

Calaveras County, which has been the “low” category for the past two weeks, continued to improve as the total number of cases of seven days per week. 100,000 inhabitants dropped to 8.71 from 58.82 on March 11th.

New hospital admissions in Calaveras County during the same period also dropped to 6.5 from 8.5, while the percentage of beds occupied fell to 4.9% from 7.4%.

Both counties also continued to show improvements in their weekly COVID-19 numbers from March 12 to Friday, though both also confirmed further deaths.

Tuolumne County reported 91 new confirmed cases from March 12 to Friday, though 13 of them were identified as incarcerated cases from the Sierra Conservation Center near Jamestown that do not count in the county’s 14-day case rate.

In addition, the Tuolumne County Public Health Department said 59 of the 78 new non-emergency cases in the community were re-infections that may be from more than two weeks earlier and not reflected in the 14-day rate because such cases often take longer to identify. , examine and confirm.

The county’s 14-day case rate from Friday also dropped to 5.9 from 8.5 a week earlier on March 11th.

A previously unreported death of a man in Tuolumne County in the 60s from COVID-19 was confirmed in Friday’s report, but the public health department noted he died in January. His death brought the county up to 180 since the pandemic began two years ago.

Public health officials in Tuolumne County said last week that they expected more deaths to be reported weeks or even months earlier as state trackers work through a backlog of omicron wave case investigations.

Other signs that Tuolumne County continued to improve included only one person admitted to COVID-19 from March 12 to Friday, a drop from four the previous week. Active cases from Friday were also down to 15 from 44 on 11 March.

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