Unprecedented 30-Day Shutdown of MBTA’s Orange Line Begins

Gates are closed, doors are locked and passengers are directed to shuttle buses instead of platforms. The MBTA’s 30-day shutdown of the Orange Line began Friday night. The 18 miles of the Orange Line, from Oak Grove to Forest Hills stations, will be closed from 9 p.m. and is expected to remain closed at 5 a.m. until Sept. 19. The start of an unprecedented lockdown heralded a convoluted dance of diversions and alternatives that Boston officials have called a “transportation emergency.” “We know this is a huge disruption, but it allows us to take a bold and decisive step to make the Orange Line and MBTA safer, more reliable and faster, and we look forward to bringing that improved service to the fore.” end of the wave,” said Steve Poftak, MBTA general manager. The city is making space in various neighborhoods for shuttle buses to load and unload passengers. Officials have said creating a path for the buses will have a ripple effect across the region, according to projections made by engineers modeling traffic for MassDOT. Motorists have been warned of an increase in traffic, especially on roads along the shuttle bus routes. State Street between Congress and Washington Street, Dartmouth Street between St. James and Boylston Street and one side of Washington Street between Arborway and Williams Street will be closed to traffic to create a path for the buses. Other streets are effectively halved by the construction of special bus lanes. Meanwhile, commuters worry about the impact on their commute to and from work. “Thirty days is a bit too long,” says Michael Lee of Malden. “We’ll see what happens if I take my alternate route. If it’s going to take me more than two hours, I might demand a work-from-home situation.” MBTA officials said they are increasing the frequency of the commuter trains to accommodate expected changes in travel patterns. Riders can also use the Commuter Rail in Zones 1, 1A and 2 for free upon presentation of a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket. “We have been using partial diversions on lines for a number of years,” said Poftak. “We will continue to use that as a tool. This one is just more dramatic.” Boston is offering a free 30-day pass to ride Bluebikes during the shutdown. From Monday, parts of the MBTA Green Line will also be closed for 28 days. The closure of the Green Line from Union Square to the Government Center stations will allow the MBTA to complete the final phase of the construction work needed to open the Medford Branch, which is expected to open in late November. Shuttle buses will also be offered to replace the Green Line Service. The City of Boston and the MBTA have announced the following number for a new MBTA call center: 617-222-3200. The MBTA is closing the Orange Line to make upgrades highlighted by the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA has been digging into the MBTA’s safety record since May after a man was dragged to death on the red line in April. A final report from the federal agency is expected to be released within weeks.

Gates are closed, doors are locked and passengers are directed to shuttle buses instead of platforms. The MBTA’s 30-day shutdown of the Orange Line began Friday night.

The 18 miles of the Orange Line, from Oak Grove to Forest Hills stations, will be closed from 9 p.m. and is expected to remain closed at 5 a.m. until Sept. 19.

The start of an unprecedented shutdown heralded a complicated dance of diversions and alternatives that Boston officials have called a “transportation emergency.”

“We know this is a huge disruption, but it allows us to take a bold and decisive step to make the Orange Line and MBTA safer, more reliable and faster, and we look forward to seeing that improved service at the end.” of the increase,” said MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak.

The city is making space in various neighborhoods for shuttle buses to load and unload passengers.

Officials have said creating a path for the buses will have a ripple effect across the region, according to projections made by engineers modeling traffic for MassDOT. Motorists have been warned of heavy traffic increases, especially on the roads along the shuttle bus routes.

State Street between Congress and Washington Street, Dartmouth Street between St. James and Boylston Street, and one side of Washington Street between Arborway and Williams Street will be closed to traffic to create a path for the buses. Other streets are effectively halved by the construction of special bus lanes.

Meanwhile, commuters worry about the impact on their commute to and from work.

“Thirty days is a bit too long,” says Michael Lee of Malden. “We’ll see what happens if I take my alternate route. If it’s going to take me more than two hours, maybe I’ll demand a work-from-home situation.”

MBTA officials said they are increasing the frequency of the commuter trains to accommodate expected changes in travel patterns. Riders can also use the Commuter Rail in Zones 1, 1A and 2 for free upon presentation of a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket.

“We have been using partial diversions on lines for a number of years,” said Poftak. “We will continue to use that as a tool. This one is just more dramatic.”

Boston is offering a free 30-day pass to ride Bluebikes during the shutdown.

From Monday, parts of the MBTA Green Line will also be closed for 28 days. The closure of the Green Line from Union Square to stations in the government center will allow the MBTA to complete the final phase of the construction work needed to open the Medford Branch, which is expected to open in late November.

Shuttle buses will also be offered to replace the Green Line service.

The City of Boston and the MBTA have announced the following number for a new MBTA Call Center: 617-222-3200.

The MBTA is shutting down the Orange Line to make upgrades highlighted by the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA has been digging into the MBTA’s safety record since May after a man was dragged to death on the red line in April. A final report from the federal agency is expected to be released within weeks.

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