White House official: US must respond to rising COVID-19 cases ‘with care and caution, but do not overreact’
White House official: US must respond to rising COVID-19 cases ‘with care and caution, but do not overreact’

White House official: US must respond to rising COVID-19 cases ‘with care and caution, but do not overreact’

White House COVID-19 response coordinator Ashish Jha said Sunday that the United States should respond to the growing number of coronavirus cases “with care and caution, but not overreact.”

The number of daily COVID-19 cases in the United States has been rising, hitting about 66,000 infections on Friday, according to Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Asked by co-author Dana Bash on CNN’s “State of the Union” about the increase, Jha said the nation should respond differently to the rising infections now compared to a year ago because the United States now has vaccines, booster shots and therapeutics.

“We would have reacted differently to this a year ago. Cases are still important, infections are still important, we want to keep the infection rates down, but they mean something different now than they did a year ago. Right? “Said Jha.

“They mean something else because people are vaccinated and boosted, they mean something else because we have a lot more therapy available. So we’ll have to change our behavior and react differently as the pandemic develops.” he added.

The White House official said it was “critical” that the United States respond to the current situation “with care and caution, but not overreact.”

Jha also told Bash on Sunday that he expects Moderna to submit an application to receive an emergency use permit for his vaccine for children five years and younger next week.

“Throughout the pandemic, we have made these decisions based on what evidence and data we have. Right now, neither Moderna nor Pfizer has yet submitted an application for emergency authorization. We expect Moderna to do so this week,” Jha said.

“Also [Food and Drug Administration] scientists will do what they have done throughout the pandemic, not true, that is, they will evaluate the data, they will evaluate it for safety and effectiveness, and they will make a decision about when, when they meet their standards, they will make that decision, ”he added.

Pressured by Bash on when it could be, Jha said it is difficult to “prejudge that analysis.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci said Thursday a vaccine for children under five may not be approved for emergency use until June.

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